What Drives Donald Trump? Fear of Losing Status, Tapes Show

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#3 L!!! for Fighting
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On the tapes, Mr. Trump portrays an energetic pleasure in battling, which began amid his youth in Queens. It didn’t make a difference, he said, whether a fight was verbal or physical. He cherished it all the same. MR. TRUMP: I was an exceptionally insubordinate sort of individual. I don’t care to discuss it, really. In any case, I was an exceptionally defiant individual and extremely set in my ways.
INTERVIEWER: In eighth grade?
MR. TRUMP: I loved to fight. I always loved to fight.
INTERVIEWER: Physical fights?
MR. TRUMP: Yeah, all kinds of fights, physical …
INTERVIEWER: Arguments?
MR. TRUMP: All types of fights. Any kind of fight, I loved it, including physical. …

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#4 The intense ambitions and undisciplined behaviors of Mr. Trump have confounded even those close to him, especially as his presidential campaign comes to a tumultuous end, and he confronts the possibility of the most stinging defeat of his life.
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The recordings uncover a man who is focused all alone big name, restless about losing his status and scornful of the individuals who go wrong. They catch the instinctive delight he gets from battling, his tenacious absence of enthusiasm for history, his hesitance to think about his life and his conviction that a great many people don’t merit his regard. In the meetings, Mr. Trump clarifies exactly how troublesome it is for him to envision — not to mention acknowledge — vanquish. “I never had a disappointment,” Mr. Trump said in one of the meetings, regardless of his rehashed corporate insolvencies and business difficulties, “since I generally transformed a disappointment into a win.” The meetings were led in 2014 by Michael D’Antonio, a Pulitzer Prize-winning correspondent who later composed a life story of Mr. Trump called “The Truth About Trump.”

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